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 Volume 16/1: includes forum "Victorian Women Traveling"
 January 2018

 Volume 15/2
 June 2017

 Volume 15/1: includes forum "Audionarratology"
 January 2017

 Volume 14/2: includes forum "Modern Jewish Spaces"
 June 2016

 Volume 14/1: includes forum Saul Bellow as a Novelist of Ideas
 January 2016

 Volume 13/2: includes forum Comics and the Canon
 

 Volume 13/1: includes forum The Ghetto as a Victorian Text
 

 Volume 12/2: includes forum The Novel and Theories of Love
 June 2014

 Volume 12/1
 January 2014

 Volume 11/2 includes Forum: Translating Philip Roth
 June 2013

 Volume 11/1
 January 2013

 Volume 10/2
 June 2012

 Volume 10/1
 January 2012

 Volume 9/2: Dickens: Uneasy Pleasures
 June 2011

 Volume 9/1
 January 2011

 Volume 8/2: British Women Writers
 June 2010

 Volume 8/1 includes forum The Ethics of Temporality
 January 2010

 Volume 7/2: Eyewitness Narratives
 June 2009

 Volume 7/1
 January 2009

 Volume 6/2: Narrative Knowing, Living, Telling
 June 2008

 Volume 6/1
 January 2008

 Volume 5/2
 June 2007

 Volume 5/1
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 Volume 4/2: Narrative as a Way of Thinking
 June 2006

 Volume 4/1
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 Volume 3/2
 June 2005

 Volume 3/1
 January 2005

 Volume 2/2
 June 2004

 Volume 2/1
 January 2004

 Volume 1/2
 June 2003

 Volume 1/1
 January 2003

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Updated Up To 18/01/2017

Call for Papers

Comics and the Canon

 

Over the last three decades, comics, graphic memoirs, and graphic novels have emerged as literary, artistic, and cultural artifacts of central importance. Comics were once seen as outside what we might broadly call a literary and fine-arts “canon”: as objects belonging to low culture rather than high culture, as ephemeral items rather than artworks of lasting and iconic significance, as lesser hybrids of word and image rather than as belonging to a specific demanding medium. And yet the last thirty years have seen the rise and impact of works that are serious, ambitious, and monumental — works in conversation with an established literary and artistic canon, and works which themselves make a claim to cultural centrality and significance. “Comics studies” has developed as an academic discipline; artists and critics have worked to recover the rich and understudied history of the medium, with the result that a “canon” of central figures is emerging.

 

What is gained and what is lost when we try to establish a Comics canon? How do artists make claims to cultural centrality by putting their work in conversation with more traditional canonical works, and how do they challenge the “canon” through exploring alternative aesthetic values and subjects? In the canon-building process of winnowing and centralization, which works are elevated and which are excluded? Is there something perverse in canonizing works in a medium that has often characterized itself as marginal? What tensions are thereby exposed, not just in comics but also in the very process of canonization?

 

This collection invites essays on all aspects of comics and canonization, including

    • analyses of comics which rewrite or otherwise engage with canonical works of art, film and literature,
    • studies that consider comics in relation to other artistic media in which word and image are traditionally combined (illustrated novels, illuminated manuscripts, film scripts and storyboards, etc.),
    • defenses and critiques of the artists whose works have become most central to the comics canon (Spiegelman, Satrapi, Bechdel),
    • arguments for the inclusion of understudied artists, artworks and movements in the comics canon,
    • essays on the ways in which comics challenge the premises and processes of literary canonization,
    • projections on the future of the “canon” in comics classes and scholarship. 

Submissions (between 5,000 and 10,000 words, the Harvard system of references) are due by June 16, 2014. Authors of the papers that are accepted will be responsible for obtaining permissions to reprint illustrations.

    The journal will accept electronic submissions, in Word or RTF, to be sent to partans@mail.huji.ac.il . For inquiries please contact the guest editor, Professor Ariela Freedman (Concordia University, Montreal) at ariela.freedman@concordia.ca .

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